Home » SCIENCE » The Influence of Human Speech on Babies

The Influence of Human Speech on Babies

A recent research conducted in US revealed that talking to one’s babies could help them to strengthen their capabilities to learn and succeed in life later.

Northwestern University psychologist Sandra Waxman, who was also involved in the research, said, “Infants as young as two or three months of age not only love to listen to speech, but they learn about fundamental cognitive and social relations better in the context of listening to speech than in any other context we have discovered yet.”

The researchers said that the infants listening to human speech are more successful than their peers listening to other interesting sounds like tone sequence, adding that listening to speech promotes much more than language-learning alone.

Waxman said, “These new results, culled from several different labs including our own, tell us that infants as young as 2 or 3 months of age not only love to listen to speech, but that they learn about fundamental cognitive and social relations better in the context of listening to speech than in any other context we’ve discovered yet. Nobody would have thought that.”

She said that the early tuned sensitivity to human language has positive, cascading developmental consequences that go way beyond learning language.

Amid, “It’s not because children have low vocabularies that they fail to achieve later on. That’s far too simple,” said Waxman, “The vocabulary of a child, raised in poverty or in plenty, is really an index of the larger context in which language participates.”

“Listening to speech promotes the babies’ acquisition of the fundamental cognitive and social psychological capacities that form the foundation for subsequent learning,” said one of the researchers Athena Vouloumanos from the New York University in the US.

The researchers studied the available literature on infants’ responses to human speech.

“This early tuned sensitivity to human language has positive, cascading developmental consequences that go way beyond learning language,” she added.

The study appeared in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*