Tag Archives: evolution

Why Did Evolution Puzzle Newton? New Model Explains Mating Selection

Why do some animals have showy ornaments such as deer antlers, peacock feathers and horns on dung beetles? Charles Darwin couldn’t figure it out, but now a Northwestern University research team has developed a mathematical model to explain the puzzling phenomenon of evolution. The mathematical model has made a surprising prediction: In animals with ornamentation, males will evolve out of ...

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Decoding Evolution of Large Brains in Primates Helps Study Human Traces

Reconstruction of ancient kiwi-sized primate skulls helped University of Florida researchers to solve an age-old miystery of evolution of large brains in apes into human species. University of Florida paleontologists found clues in lemur-like primate skulls from the tropical forests of Wyoming about 50 million years ago, thought to be a link between primitive and advanced primates. Arianna Harrington, a ...

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Neanderthals Mated Modern Humans Much Earlier Than Previously Thought: Shows DNA Analysis

neanderthals, modern humans, mating

(Video Credit: COLD SPRING HARBOR LABORATORY) Based on DNA analysis, an international research team has found strong evidence of an interbreeding event between Neanderthals and modern humans that occurred 100,000 years ago, almost 50,000 years earlier than what anthropologists previously thought. The scientists provided the first genetic evidence of a scenario in which early modern humans left the African continent ...

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Missing Link Between Humans, Apes Could be Unique African Chimp: Experts

Close on the heels of making it to news when visiting US President Barack Obama was introduced to “Lucy” — the 3.2 million-year-old Australopithecus afarensis discovered in Ethiopia in 1974, Africa has again made an overwhelming announcement that its scientists were able to find the missing link in human evolution. A team of paleoanthropologists—including Zeray Alemseged, the senior curator of ...

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Animals, Not Meteorite, Caused First Mass Extinction 540 Million Years Ago: Study

What led to the world’s first known mass extinction 540 million years ago? Not a meteorite or volcano but the rise of early animals, said a new study emphasizing the environmental destruction by these complex early life organism. Since early life consisted of Ediacarans, the world’s first multicellular organisms, the study says it was the appearance of complex animals capable ...

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Birdwatch: How Chestnut-bellied Monarch Survives on Solomon Islands?

This image shows a typical Chestnut-bellied Monarch (left) vs. a melanic individual (right). CREDIT A. Uy

Animals living in islands tend to develop weird traits to acclamatize themselves with the environment over time, becoming big like Galapagos tortoises or small like extinct dwarf elephants or losing the ability to fly like the flightless parrots of New Zealand. But some animals have a tendency to develop “melanism” or, dark or black coloration, cites a new study. J. ...

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Ancient Skull with Membrane Intact Found in China

Archaeologists have discovered 100,000 years old human bones in Central China’s Lingjing historical site in Xuchang, with bite marks pointing at prey or other humans attacking him to death, said Li Zhanyang, a researcher at the Henan Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology. The Lingjing site has thrown up seven fossil remains so far, making it the largest site ...

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Too much male attention ruins pretty females: New Study

One of the biggest perk of being beautiful is getting overwhelming attention. And mostly every attractive person enjoys that. However, according to a new study by Australian and Canadian researchers on fruit flies, excessive male sexual attention ruins pretty females. Steve Chenoweth who is the associate professor of the University of Queensland’s School of Biological Sciences stated the study projected ...

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Scientists reveal why Parrots are such great vocal imitators

Do you have a parrot that speaks in an exact tone like you and repeats every word perfectly after you? It is insane in fact, but while you must be wondering how they are able to do that, a group of international scientists led by researchers from Duke University has got the answer. A study reported in June 24 by ...

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35000-Year-Old Dog Bone Shows Earliest Evidence of Man-Dog Friendship

Dogs shed their lineage with the wolf 30,000 years ago and became the best friend to humans 27,000 to 40,000 years ago, said a new study, setting aside previous estimates at 16,000 years ago. The genome from the wolf from Taimyr Peninsula in Siberia, dated 35,000 years ago, shows that the most recent common ancestor of modern wolves and dogs ...

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Human chin came from evolution, not because of chewing, says study

Unlike the nearest species to homo sapiens such as chimpanzees or erstwhile Neanderthals, only humans or homo homo-sapiens have chins and it was long believed that this was by virtue of our constant chewing or eating ability. But a new study shows that it was not due to mechanical forces but resulted from an evolutionary adaptation involving face size and shape. ...

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Why cold blooded animals grow smaller in warm water?

Ever wondered why cold blooded animals grow bigger in the warm weather on land, but smaller in warm water? The availability of oxygen may hold the key, finds a new study. "Enhancing our understanding of what influences the growth of animals will mean we can start to make better predictions about how different groups of species will cope with the ...

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Italian cemetery behind cholera evolution?

An ancient graveyard in Italy can yield clues about the evolution of deadly bacterium that causes cholera, researchers believe. The researchers are excavating the graveyard surrounding the abandoned Badia Pozzeveri church in the Tuscany region of Italy. The site contains victims of the cholera epidemic that swept the world in the 1850s. “We have a thousand-year window into the health ...

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Evolution: Why humans are affected less by retroviral infections than other animals?

The proportion of humans infected with retroviruses is less when compared with other animals as we have fewer remnants of viral DNA in our genes, said a new research. Attributing this phenomenon to reduced exposure to blood-borne viruses as humans evolved to use tools rather than biting during violent conflict and the hunting of animals, the researchers said, “One reason ...

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