Tag Archives: bacteria

Korean Scientist Develops Paper Battery Based on Origami Concept

  Japanese paper art origami has given birth to a new battery model at Binghamton University where a Korean engineer developed the technique that can be applied to building batteries. Seokheun “Sean” Choi has developed an inexpensive, bacteria-powered battery made from paper, that generates power from microbial respiration, delivering enough energy to run a paper-based biosensor with nothing more than ...

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Peppermint oil with cinnamaldehyde helps to treat and cure chronic wounds: New study

Scientists across the U.S have discovered that peppermint oil and cinnamaldehyde can help in the treatment and curing of chronic wounds. Photo Credit: FotoosVanRobin The research led by Vincent M. Rotello of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and others from other institutes, stated that self-assembling capsules containing peppermint oil and cinnamaldehyde can effectively kill the bacteria inside a biofilm that ...

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Sharing Toothbrush or paste leads to bacterial infections: Study

Bacteria can pass on easily if people share toothbrushes and even paste as the bacteria fecal coliforms spread far wide and faster and results in the willies in the intestines, says a study. Traceable to similar studies in the past, bathrooms or washrooms are the focal points of baterial infections coming under researchers’ radar increasingly of late. Lauren Aber of ...

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Mouth bacteria can tell the status of liver disease

Analysing the ratio of good-bad bacteria in saliva, not just in the gut as earlier thought, could help doctors predict which liver cirrhosis patients would suffer inflammations and require hospitalisation, say researchers, including one of Indian-origin. “It has been believed that most of the pathogenesis of cirrhosis starts in the gut, which is what makes this discovery so fascinating,” said ...

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How gut bacteria affect brain health?

The hundred trillion bacteria living in our gut have a significant impact on human behaviour and brain health, reports an Indian American researcher. “The diverse gut bacteria can impact normal brain activity and development, affect sleep and stress responses, play a role in a variety of diseases and be modified through diet for therapeutic use,” said Sampath Parthasarathy, Florida Hospital ...

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Public Spitting Still Main Cause Spreading TB; Time to Spread Awareness?

While TB or tuberculosis is raising its ugly head again, more than its new drug-resistance character, the root-cause has come under focus. The public spitting, a habit indigenous to India since the ancient times, still persists, say authroties and doctors. One of the worst offenders of public spitting are drivers of vehicles and paan-chewing public and no matter what the ...

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Beer-digesting bacteria may help fight auto-immune disease: Study

Bacteria that helps us digest, develop prebiotic medicines and the yeast that gives beer and bread their bubbles could also help in fighting off yeast infections and autoimmune diseases such as Crohn’s disease, say researchers. The findings could accelerate the development of prebiotic medicines to help people suffering from bowel problems and autoimmune diseases, new findings said. For over 7,000 ...

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Bacterial Phobia: Restrooms not as bad as you may think, say researchers

Toilets at your home are not as unhealthy as you may think but never healthy either, finds a study. In the study, researchers from San Diego State University in California analyzed the abundance of the microbial community on floors, toilet seats and soap dispensers. “We hypothesised that while bacteria would be dispersed rapidly due to toilet flushing, they would not ...

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Don’t even smell sewage, it has 234 known viruses: study

Don’t ever smell sewage, a new study reveals that there are 234 known viruses in it besides harmful bacteria, germs and, of course, insects. Scientists have identified 234 known viruses so far in sewage flushed out in three cities of  Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States, Barcelona in Spain and Addis Ababa in Ethiopia. The finding reverses the widely-held belief that only ...

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