Home » SCIENCE » Hubble Locates a New Gem in Space
This colourful bubble is a planetary nebula called NGC 6818, also known as the Little Gem Nebula. It is located in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), roughly 6000 light-years away from us. The rich glow of the cloud is just over half a light-year across — humongous compared to its tiny central star — but still a little gem on a cosmic scale. When stars like the Sun enter retirement, they shed their outer layers into space to create glowing clouds of gas called planetary nebulae. This ejection of mass is uneven, and planetary nebulae can have very complex shapes. NGC 6818 shows knotty filament-like structures and distinct layers of material, with a bright and enclosed central bubble surrounded by a larger, more diffuse cloud. Scientists believe that the stellar wind from the central star propels the outflowing material, sculpting the elongated shape of NGC 6818. As this fast wind smashes through the slower-moving cloud it creates particularly bright blowouts at the bubble’s outer layers. Hubble previously imaged this nebula back in 1997 with its Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, using a mix of filters that highlighted emission from ionised oxygen and hydrogen (opo9811h). This image, while from the same camera, uses different filters to reveal a different view of the nebula. A version of the image was submitted to the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Judy Schmidt.

Hubble Locates a New Gem in Space

The Hubble Space Telescope (HST), which is running its 25th year in the space currently, spotted a little gem – a planetary nebula, there.

The planetary nebula known as “NGC 6818” or “Little Gem Nebula” is an intergalactic cloud of dust, helium, hydrogen and many other ionized gases. It is situated in the constellation of Sagittarius also called “The Archer”, and is nearly 6,000 light-years far from the Earth.

This colourful bubble is a planetary nebula called NGC 6818, also known as the Little Gem Nebula. It is located in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), roughly 6000 light-years away from us. The rich glow of the cloud is just over half a light-year across — humongous compared to its tiny central star — but still a little gem on a cosmic scale. When stars like the Sun enter retirement, they shed their outer layers into space to create glowing clouds of gas called planetary nebulae. This ejection of mass is uneven, and planetary nebulae can have very complex shapes. NGC 6818 shows knotty filament-like structures and distinct layers of material, with a bright and enclosed central bubble surrounded by a larger, more diffuse cloud. Scientists believe that the stellar wind from the central star propels the outflowing material, sculpting the elongated shape of NGC 6818. As this fast wind smashes through the slower-moving cloud it creates particularly bright blowouts at the bubble’s outer layers. Hubble previously imaged this nebula back in 1997 with its Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, using a mix of filters that highlighted emission from ionised oxygen and hydrogen (opo9811h). This image, while from the same camera, uses different filters to reveal a different view of the nebula. A version of the image was submitted to the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Judy Schmidt.

This colourful bubble is a planetary nebula called NGC 6818, also known as the Little Gem Nebula. It is located in the constellation of Sagittarius (The Archer), roughly 6000 light-years away from us. The rich glow of the cloud is just over half a light-year across — humongous compared to its tiny central star — but still a little gem on a cosmic scale. When stars like the Sun enter retirement, they shed their outer layers into space to create glowing clouds of gas called planetary nebulae. This ejection of mass is uneven, and planetary nebulae can have very complex shapes. NGC 6818 shows knotty filament-like structures and distinct layers of material, with a bright and enclosed central bubble surrounded by a larger, more diffuse cloud. Scientists believe that the stellar wind from the central star propels the outflowing material, sculpting the elongated shape of NGC 6818. As this fast wind smashes through the slower-moving cloud it creates particularly bright blowouts at the bubble’s outer layers. Hubble previously imaged this nebula back in 1997 with its Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, using a mix of filters that highlighted emission from ionised oxygen and hydrogen (opo9811h). This image, while from the same camera, uses different filters to reveal a different view of the nebula. A version of the image was submitted to the Hubble’s Hidden Treasures image processing competition by contestant Judy Schmidt.

Although the powerful glow of the bolus is more than only half a light-year beyond it is enormous considered to its petite central star. However, it is still a minute gem on a celestial degree.

When sun – a form of a star goes to “retirement,” it peels off its exterior coating to foster shimmering bolus of gas known as planetary nebulae. This expulsion of mass is irregular, and planetary nebulae might end up with quite complicated shapes. Little Gem reflects difficult thread-like structures and separate layers of material apart from a shining and engulfed central bubble encompassed by a bigger, more disseminated cloud.

NASA scientists believe that the planetary wind from the central star pushes the peeled off material, molding the extended shape of Little Gem. “As this fast wind smashes through the slower-moving cloud it creates particularly bright blowouts at the bubble’s outer layers,” NASA added.

Earlier this, Hubble captured the picture of this very nebula way back in 1997 with the latter’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. It used an amalgamation of filters, which threw light on the discharge from ionized oxygen and hydrogen.

The new picture seized by Hubble albeit used the same camera it used back in 1997, utilized varied filters to divulge a diverse sight of the nebula.

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