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Green Alien Eggs Spotted on Sydney Beach Could be Algae Seaweed Hairballs?

alien eggsMorning Bay Watchers at the Sydney Beach were stunned to find round green algae-like eggs spread over in thousands ashore and some sufers say they are alien eggs left behind by Unidentified Flying Objects of UFOs.

Found in Dee Why, on Sydney’s North Shore, the overnight appearance of the alien eggs are brushed aside as mere sponge-like seaweed that forms egg shapes possibly to protect themselves from predators. Locals said they never witnessed such a strange phenomenon of “alien hairballs” looking like Japanese moss balls or UFOs.

‘About three days ago, there were a few egg-shaped balls but then today, they were much bigger and everywhere on the beach,’ Naraweena resident Jenny Zhang told The Manly Daily. ‘It was a windy day with a very high tide. I picked one up and squeezed it and it was so squishy – but I wasn’t sure if it was alive and was worried I might hurt anything inside!’ she told the Daily Mail. ‘It struck me how perfectly shaped they all were and how green and alive they looked.’

But Associate Professor Alistair Poore from the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of NSW said the balls were probably an extremely rare species of filamentous green algae.

They are known in Japan as ‘Marimo’ and Cladophora ball or Lake ball in English, and often found in freshwater lakes in the Northern Hemisphere. They are a type of free living algae, not attached to rocks, and hence form into balls. They are washed ashore by warmer weather and the rough waves, experts say.

It’s unknown why the algae forms into balls. One hypothesis is that a ball-shape helps protect the algae from hungry fish, another that it may help them roll back into the water and avoid drying out when they wash ashore.

Last month, in a similar strange phenomenon, the waves at Manly Beach were lit up like fluorescent blue for three nights by ‘agitated’ phytoplankton.


  1. Excellent blog here! Also your website loads up very fast!
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  2. They are known as “Marimo” in japanese, not “marumo”!

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