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Climate Change Dialogue: Javadekar Seeks Clarity on Green Fund Pre-2020 Contributions, Pledges

The Minister of State for Environment, Forest and Climate Change (Independent Charge), Shri Prakash Javadekar briefing the press on the meeting of the Environment Ministers of National Capital Region, (NCR), in New Delhi on April 13, 2015.(PIB)

The Minister of State for Environment, Forest and Climate Change (Independent Charge), Shri Prakash Javadekar briefing the press on the meeting of the Environment Ministers of National Capital Region, (NCR), in New Delhi on April 13, 2015.(PIB)

India has reiterated its commitment to work towards finding practical, pragmatic and equitable solutions to climate change, said Environment Minister Prakash Javadekar making an intervention at the Petersberg Climate Dialogue in Berlin on Wednesday.

He said that every Climate Action has a cost and the nations should decide who would pay for it under the “Polluter Pays” principle.

Reiterating a tough stand India’s environment minister Prakash Javadekar has sought clarification on the $100 billion Green Climate Fund (GCF) expressing his concerns over the collection pace and realisation by the targeted year 2020.

The fund to be made up of the contributions from the developed nations who have pledged in the past to help poorer and developing nations to explore the renewable and alternate energy sources to mitigate the green house gases from carbon emissions.

India has consistently made its point that the developed nations, which have contributed to green house emissions in the past half-a-century should pay for the corrective measures to be taken up by the emerging nations which need similar energy sources as of now to make any progress.

The impact of carbon emissions on global climate change may lead to global warming that may erode the coastal areas and sink most of them in a century from now, according to the IPCC annual report. India has made its stand clear that the Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) or voluntary action by each country to mitigate global warming must be compensated by the developed nation by means of technology transfer and investments in greener fields.

Since all the nations are expected to present their pledges towards the Green Fund at the Paris Conference to be held in December, India has asked the developed nations to come forward with their contributions, while the developing nations unveil their plans.

Reiterating India’s stand on climate change in consonance with the equitable principle of common but differentiated responsibilities (CBDR), Javadekar said, “I strongly feel that the most important and cross-cutting issues for the 2015 Agreement are of differentiation and provision of finance. The principle of equity and CBDR must encompass all aspects of the 2015 agreement.”

Assuring the other nations that India will continue to play a responsible role in the international negotiations not under external pressure but because of climate change keeping in mid aspirations of future generations.

Bringing in the Lima Conference decision, he sought to finalize the draft decision text for Pre-2020 actions by the developed countries in the Bonn session to be held next month (June) 2015. Since the Copenhagen decision 2/CP.15 clearly mentions “SCALED UP NEW AND ADDITIONAL, ADEQUATE AND PREDICTABLE” funding to be provided to developing countries, he reminded the developed world and all the countries preparing their INDCs “must know the quantum of international financial assistance,” he said.

He refuted the Official Development Assistance (ODA, pegged at 0.7 % of the GDP by the developed countries already committed under various past agreements saying they cannot be termed as new and additional.Though the goal for the Green Fund was $100 billion, “we are nowhere near it,” he said.

On the question of Intellectual Property Rights (IPR), he said his suggestion is not to dismantle the IPR regime, but to make climate-friendly technologies available to the developing countries at affordable costs by paying the costs through GCF.

“We must discuss these issues in greater detail in the coming months to enhance our understanding and articulation of these problems,” said Javadekar, drumming up support from both the developed and developing world to unveil the pre-2020 contribution pledges towards the Green Fund in June at Bonn Meet.

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