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4 Eggs Per Week Good But More Harmful: New study

"Deviled Eggs - 3-23-08" by Marshall Astor from San Pedro, United States - Deviled Eggs - Inagaural Portable Potluck Project - 3-23-08. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Deviled_Eggs_-_3-23-08.jpg#/media/File:Deviled_Eggs_-_3-23-08.jpg

“Deviled Eggs – 3-23-08” by Marshall Astor from San Pedro, United States – Deviled Eggs – Inagaural Portable Potluck Project – 3-23-08. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Deviled_Eggs_-_3-23-08.jpg#/media/File:Deviled_Eggs_-_3-23-08.jpg

Egg farms will be cheerful to the latest news that at least 4 eggs a week in your diet would reduce the risk of diabetes, contrary to long-held belief that the cholesterol-rich egg is an anamoly to healthy life.

Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland were equally surprised when their finding showed that eggs could reduce the risk developing Type 2 diabetes by 40% per cent.

They are now quick to attribute the reason to nutrients, which improve the metabolism in the body to make use of sugar and reduce inflammation that often causes diabetes.

After studying the eating habits of 2,332 middle-aged men during the l980s, the scientists found that those who regularly took 4 eggs a week were 38% less likely to fall ill than those who never ate eggs or rarely consumed them.

Moreover, these 38% of men also showed lower blood sugar levels no increase in their cholesterol levels.

The study did not consider the way the egg was cooked for the study and still the results were positive, showing that the cholesterol effect was not much among those who ate it four times in a week, said the study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

However, as stated the study contradicts a 2008 finding that people who eat eggs every day — at seven or more per week — were 58% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who did not eat eggs, and women were 77% more likely to become diabetic.

The past study by Luc Djouss of Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard, that was published in Diabetes Care said daily intake of an egg incrementally increased diabetes risk in both men and women (both P<0.0001 for trend) as egg contains cholesterol of a about 200 mg, about 1.5 g of saturated fat.

Though they noted that about 0.7 g of polyunsaturated fat in egg may confer a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, the researchers noted that evidence for effect of eggs or dietary cholesterol on glucose metabolism has been inconsistent.

They noted the hazard ratios for type 2 diabetes in men as:

9% for less than one egg a week (hazard ratio 1.09, 0.87 to 1.37)
9% for one egg a week (HR 1.09, 0.88 to 1.34)
18% for two to four eggs a week (HR 1.18, 0.95 to 1.45)
46% for five to six eggs per week (HR 1.46, 1.14 to 1.86)
58% for seven or more eggs each week (HR 1.58, 1.25 to 2.01)

For women, the multivariate-adjusted risks, also at the 95% confidence interval, compared with no egg intake were:

6% for less than one egg per week (HR 1.06, 0.92 to 1.22)
-3% for one egg a week (HR 0.97, 0.83 to 1.12)
19% for two to four eggs per week (HR 1.19, 1.03 to 1.38)
18% for five to six eggs a week (HR 1.18, 0.88 to 1.58)
77% for seven or more per week (HR 1.77, 1.28 to 2.43).

 

One comment

  1. Ram Singh Sachan

    An exhaustive critical review of literature is needed to arrive at a definite conclusion about the utility or safety of egg eating.

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