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3 Helpful Websites to Fix Email Hacks by Heartbleed Bug

email_hackedBig corporates, including Google, are busy fixing the Heartbleed bug that was indeed found two years after it began spreading across the Internet. In fact, the attackers might have exploited this bug in the last two years much to the chagrin of the major IT and online retail firms.

How to Find-Out if an Account Was Hacked?

In order to check if any of your online accounts have been hacked because of Heartbleed bug, here are five ways to get around with the issue:

Forbes has come up with three websites — haveibeenpwned.com, PwnedList.com and Shouldichangemypassword.com

1. The Web site haveibeenpwned.com allows users to enter their email address to see if hackers have compromised the mail id or the associated accounts.

2. One other Web site PwnedList.com can be used to check if the email and the associated accounts have been hacked. In addition to telling if the account is hacked, this Web site also provides the date of the attack.

3. Another Web site Shouldichangemypassword.com works in the similar way like the websites listed above.

These websites have an option that would let them notify the users directly if the same email address is compromised again in future.

What should you do, if your account has been hacked?

First, change the account password immediately. It should work. For those on desktops or laptops, try ‘1Password’ tool that helps you manage password, track users’ passwords for various accounts with features like auto-fill, password generator, credit card support, and secure notes.

For Android mobile phone users, LastPass for Android is the best password management tool.

Heartbleed security flaw has affected 66% of the entire Internet users and the bug has also compromised the usernames and passwords on innumerable popular websites and services, including the Android Apps in Google Play Store.

Steve Thomas of PwnedList says, “The site learns of about a dozen different data leaks each day, where 100,000 to 500,000 accounts/services are compromised.”

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